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Wednesday, June 16

  1. page An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge edited ... Describe the setting: It takes place on Owl Creek Bridge, a bridge over a rushing stream. Typ…
    ...
    Describe the setting: It takes place on Owl Creek Bridge, a bridge over a rushing stream.
    Type of Conflict: Man Vs Man, and Man. Vs. Enviroment.
    ...
    main conflict: A man is fighting for his life against a stream, and the military that is trying to kill him.
    Describe the
    ...
    the Story: The climax is when Peyton starts ''swimming''.
    How does
    ...
    the story? He goes from living, to hallucinating, to dead.
    Describe the
    ...
    the theme. The theme is the thoughts before death, and it ties in with title, because the title tells of the place he was at while these thoughts were occurring.
    How does
    ...
    the theme? The main conflict helps to illustrate the ''thoughts before death'' theme, because the main conflict is Man Vs. Man, and he is thinking these thoughts while the men are attempting to kill him.
    How does
    ...
    the theme? The climax helps to illustrate the theme, because it give us an idea of how powerful his will to live is.
    Give examples of each of the following literary terms in the story (use quotes):
    Simile: Striking through the thought of his dear ones was a sound which he could neither ignore nor understand, a sharp, distinct, metallic percussion like the stroke of a blacksmith's hammer upon the anvil, it had the same ringing quality.
    Metaphor: Death is a dignitary who when he comes announced is to be received with formal manifestations of respect, even by those most familiar with him.
    Personification: How slowly it appeared to move, what a sluggish stream!
    Symbol: His face had not been covered, nor his eyes bandaged.
    Foreshadowing (give both elements): The commandant has issued an order, which is posted everywhere, declaring that any civilian caught interfering with the railroad, its bridges, tunnels, or trains will be summarily hanged.
    Irony: He springs forward with extended arms. As he is about to clasp her he feels a stunning blow upon the back of the neck; a blinding white light blazes all about him with a sound like the shock of the cannon - then all is darkness and silence!
    Imagery: His neck was in pain, and lifting his hand to it found it to be heavily swollen. He knew that it had a circle of black where the rope had bruised it.
    Describe the
    ...
    the story. This another aspect of humanity: death. It is an everyday occurrence, and plays a huge part in both humanity and literature.
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    9:24 pm
  2. page An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge edited Point of View: Omniscent and Second Person. Protagonist: Peyton Farquhar. What type of character…
    Point of View: Omniscent and Second Person.
    Protagonist: Peyton Farquhar.
    What type of character is the Protagonist? A round character.
    Antagonist: The military.
    Describe the setting: It takes place on Owl Creek Bridge, a bridge over a rushing stream.
    Type of Conflict: Man Vs Man, and Man. Vs. Enviroment.
    Describe the main conflict:
    Describe the Climax of the Story:
    How does the Protagonist change over the course of the story?
    Describe the relationship between the title and the theme.
    How does the main conflict help to illustrate the theme?
    How does the climax help to illustrate the theme?
    Give examples of each of the following literary terms in the story (use quotes):
    Simile:
    Metaphor:
    Personification:
    Symbol:
    Foreshadowing (give both elements):
    Irony:
    Imagery:
    Describe the relationships between the class theme and the story.

    (view changes)
    2:58 pm

Tuesday, June 15

  1. page Exam Review edited Theme Time: 25 min Before you begin to read, take a moment to think about what this theme means…

    Theme Time: 25 min
    Before you begin to read, take a moment to think about what this theme means to you.
    Theme Time: 25 min-The lessons we learn affectThe lessons we learn affect
    Theme Time: 25 min-our futureour future
    I Grew Up
    by Lenore Keeshig-Tobias
    i grew up on the reserve1
    thinking it was the most
    beautiful place in the world
    i grew up thinking
    “i’m never going
    to leave this place”
    i was a child
    a child who would
    lie under trees
    watching the wind’ s rhythms
    sway leafy boughs
    back and forth
    and rocking me as
    i snuggled in the grass
    like a bug basking in the sun
    i grew up on the reserve
    thinking it was the most
    beautiful place in the world
    i grew up thinking
    “i’m never going
    to leave this place”
    i was a child
    a child who ran
    wild rhythms
    through the fields
    the streams
    the bush
    eating berries
    cupping cool water
    to my wild stained mouth
    and hiding in the
    treetops with
    my friends
    we used to laugh at teachers
    and tourists who referred to
    our bush as “forest” or “woods”
    “forest” or “woods”
    were places of
    fairytale text
    were places where people,
    especially children, got lost
    where wild beasts roamed
    our bush was where we played
    and where the rabbits squirrels
    foxes deer and the bear lived
    i grew up thinking
    “i’m never going
    to leave this place”
    i grew up on the reserve
    thinking it was the most
    beautiful place in the world
    1. Which aspect of her childhood on the reserve does the speaker describe?
    A. going to school B. playing outside C. reading fairy tales D. hiding from danger B
    2. To what does the speaker compare herself?
    A. abug B. a tree C. the sun D. the wind A
    3. What does the phrase “ran / wild rhythms” (lines 23 and 24) suggest about the speaker as a child?
    A. She was difficult to control. B. She was reluctant to grow up. C. She enjoyed chasing wild animals. D. She felt in harmony with the environment. D
    4. When she was a child, what word did the speaker use to refer to the land on the reserve?
    A. bush B. wilds C. forest D. woods A
    5. How did the speaker react to the tourists and teachers?
    A. She stared at them. B. She respected them. C. She welcomed them. D. She laughed at them. D
    6. What is suggested about the speaker as an adult?
    A. She misses her old friends. B. She may feel differently about the reserve. C. She no longer appreciates the beauty of nature. D. She is saddened by the destruction of the environment. D
    7. Which literary device is used throughout the poem?
    A. rhyme B. repetition C. symbolism D. onomatopoeia C
    8. What did the speaker most enjoy about growing up on the reserve?
    A. the sense of freedom B. the isolation from others C. the food the reserve supplied D. the visitors who came to the reserve A
    9. Which point of view is used in the poem?
    A. objective B. omniscient C. first person D. limited omniscient B
    In this excerpt, the narrator works in his father’s antique store and has an unexpected visit from Raphaella, a former opponent in high school debates.
    Stones
    by William Bell
    Olde Gold Antiques and Collectibles was a narrow, two-storey red- brick building with The Magus, a bookstore, on one side and an espresso bar on the other. The store occupied the main floor, with a showroom at the front, a small office and a workshop out back. Overhead was a stamped-tin ceiling, thick with many coats of paint, and the floor was made of pegged oak planks. There was a cellar, dark and creepy, where the bathroom was and where we stored pieces waiting to be refinished or repaired.
    Business was transacted in a time warp: cash only, unless the customer was local; then we would take a check. Each sale was recorded on an invoice, white copy for the buyer, yellow for us, and rung up on a huge ancientcash register with heavy nickel-plated trim. When the big round keys were pressed, labels popped up into a window, showing the amount of the sale, and the contraption let out a ring! that they could probably hear across the street in the library. There was no computer, no credit cards, Air Miles, special offers, coupons or mailing lists, no money-back guarantee.
    “Buy it, give us the money, and keep it” was Dad’s retailing motto.
    I worked there on Saturdays, opening up at ten and closing at five. I usually had the place to myself. When she wasn’t off chasing a story, Mom would be at home and Dad was usually on the road hunting up treasures at auctions and garage sales. There was a brass bell hanging over the front door that summoned me from the workshop when somebody came in.
    I liked the job. There had been a time when I’d had a burst of independence, insisting on a “real job” somewhere outside the family business. I found one, at a department store in the mall. After I’d been there a couple of months the manager told me to follow an old woman around the store and keep an eye on her. She was wearing a ratty old cloth raincoat with a scarf on her head. A toddler, wearing clothes that were too small for him, stood in the shopping cart, pretending to pilot it through the store as his grandmother pushed. I watched the woman pocket a kid-size toothbrush, a comb with a cartoon character head on it, a packet of gum. She got on the elevator and I slipped in just as the door was closing.
    “They’re watching you,” I said to the doors. “They know what you’re doing.”
    She rode the elevator back down, got off and put all the stuff back. It touched me when she did that. She could have dumped the items on the elevator floor or laid them on a shelf somewhere and walked away. They caught her putting the comb back in the display case. Security had called the cops.
    When the manager ordered me to tell Security what I had seen I said, “Nothing.” Red-faced and cursing, he fired me on the spot. When I left the store, the old lady and her grandson were sitting in the back of a police car. I guessed I wasn’t hard-hearted enough for the commercial world.
    Anyway, on a sunny Saturday a week or so after the blizzard, I opened the store as usual. Cars hissed past, throwing dirty slush to the edge of the sidewalk, and shoppers walked briskly in the chilly air. Across the street the giant icicles hanging from the eaves of the opera house were turned to crystal by the morning sun.
    I put a Mozart CD on the stereo and switched on the electric heater in the shop. Then I ducked into the espresso bar for a double-shot latte, took it back to the shop and put on my apron.
    I was working on a replacement slat for a crib bed—an easy job, just a matter of cutting it to length and planing it smooth. It was a slow morning, normal for that time of year. I sold a few pieces of the pottery we take on consignment from a local artisan, and a couple of old medicine bottles. Just before lunch the bell tinkled again.
    I brushed the wood shavings from my apron, drained the last of the latte and went into the showroom. Standing in the doorway, wiping her boots on the mat, was Raphaella.
    *
    She was wearing a red woolen Hudson’s Bay coat and a floppy white tam1. The cold air had raised a bit of color in her pale skin, seeming to darken the birthmark. She caught sight of me.
    “Oh” was all she said. 15
    I couldn’t find my voice. I felt my neck and face flush hot, and something leapt in my stomach.
    “I didn’t know you worked here,” she said, pulling off thick knitted mittens.
    “Er, we own the place.”
    “Oh. Well, that’s great.”
    Her eyes roamed the room. Mine stayed locked on her. How many love songs had I heard that said, “She takes my breath away”? Now I knew what that line meant. My legs were numb. My vocal cords didn’t seem to work properly any more. I was painfully conscious of my stained apron and the block plane in my hand.
    “You have some nice pieces here,” she commented, running her hand along a maple sideboard.
    “Thanks. Dad finds them.”
    “I wouldn’t have figured you for the antique type,” she said. “No offence.”
    “I refinished almost everything here,” I blurted. “The furniture, I mean.” I shut up before I made another stupid remark.
    One corner of her mouth turned up in a half-smile. She touched a water jug and porcelain basin sitting on a pine dry sink, then traced the grain in the wood with her finger. “Nice work.”
    *
    I took up my work again, just to keep my hands busy and give me something to do. I knew I’d fidget if I didn’t.
    “That’s a beautiful crib,” she said. “It’s a cliché, I know, but they don’t make them like that anymore.”
    “They can’t. They’re illegal, considered an unsafe design. But I know what you mean.”
    I removed the slat from the vise and ran a bit of sandpaper over it. I had already drilled and countersunk two holes in each end, so I fitted it into place and screwed it down tight. Raphaella watched every move, making me slightly self-conscious, as if she was memorizing each step.
    When I put down the screwdriver and took a mouthful of juice, she said, “Are you sure you’re the same guy who was praising logic and reason in the debate?”
    “Why do you ask?”
    “You love wood.”
    She was inviting me to share something I seldom talked about, except to my parents. Before I knew it, I was babbling away as if I’d known her for years. I told her about the pleasure and sense of achievement it gave me to fashion something from a piece of walnut or oak, how I sometimes felt a sort of communion with the wood, how, when I worked, I entered a state of concentration that dissolved my sense of time.
    “That’s why, when I’m here alone on Saturdays, I only do simple jobs like this one,” I said. “If I get into a really complicated or delicate project, I lose track of everything else and forget to mind the store.”
    She laughed. “I’ll bet you’ve lost a few sales that way.”
    “Dad got some complaints there for a while.”
    “Have you ever made a piece of furniture from scratch?”
    “You mean copies?”
    “I was thinking about originals.”
    How had she known that was exactly what I wanted to do? When I had time on my hands, mostly at school when the teacher droned on about land formations or family planning, I doodled and sketched cabinets, chests, tables—whatever came to mind, then balled up the paper and threw it away.
    “I’m afraid to try, if you want to know the truth.”
    Raphaella made no reply.
    “I’m scared that if I try I’ll mess up and ruin everything. I sound like a coward, I know.”
    She shook her head, but still said nothing.
    “My dream is to find someone to teach me to design furniture, then open my own shop one day. I don’t care if I make a lot of money, just enough to get by and live the way I want.”
    “Then do it,” she said simply, as if she was commenting on the weather.
    I laughed self-consciously. “Yeah, all I have to do is convince my mother. She wants me to Be Somebody.”
    “I know the feeling,” she said.
    A little later, Raphaella looked at her watch and told me she had to go.
    “I enjoyed our talk,” she said at the door.
    It was only after she had left that I realized she hadn’t said a word about herself.
    10. What does the description of the shop suggest about the character of the narrator’s father?
    A. He is devoted to his job. B. He is careful with money. C. He is proud of the narrator. D. He is traditional in his ways. D
    11. Why does the narrator take a job in a department store at the mall?
    A. He wants a regular pay cheque. B. He dislikes working on his own. C. He wants to earn his own way in the world. D. He wants to learn about modern retail practices. C
    12. What do the items taken by the old woman suggest about her reasons for stealing them?
    A. She blames society for her situation. B. She cares more about others than herself. C. She worries about her physical appearance. D. She resents paying high prices for trivial things. D
    13. How did the narrator’s experience working at the department store change his attitude?
    A. He realizes how lucky he is to have a well-paying job. B. He accepts that soft-hearted people are not suited to big business. C. He recognizes that he takes pleasure in being given greater responsibility. D. He learns to appreciate the impersonal nature of his job at the antique store. B
    14. Which literary device does the author use to describe the shoplifting incident?
    bias B. allusion C. flashback D. foreshadowing C
    15. Why does the narrator continue working on the crib after Raphaella arrives?
    A. He needs to distract himself. B. He is in a hurry to finish the job. C. He has to make the crib legally safe. D. He wants to impress her with his skill. A
    16. How does Raphaella encourage the narrator to confide in her?
    A. through polite criticism B. through intense dialogue C. through gentle questioning D. through spirited discussion D
    17. Based on her interaction with the narrator, which word best describes Raphaella?
    A. critical B. skeptical C. perceptive D. courageous C
    18. Which literary term best describes the author’s writing style?
    A. satirical B. technical C. argumentative D. conversational D

    (view changes)
    12:44 pm

Monday, June 14

  1. page Poetry Analysis edited Most cats, with the exception of Burmese, do not celebrate their birthdays. Rather, they are ext…

    Most cats, with the exception of Burmese, do not celebrate their birthdays. Rather, they are extremely sentimental about Palm Sunday and Labour Day, at which times they survive solely on white lace and baloney sandwiches.
    Cats on the whole are loath to discuss God.
    Generally speaking, cats have no money, although some of them secretly collect rare and valuable coins.
    Cats believe that all human beings, animals and plants should congregate in a huge heap in the centre of the universe and promptly fall asleep together.
    Of all the cats I have known, the ones I remember most are: Bumble Bee, Buttonhole, Chocolate Bar, Molten Lava and Mushroom. I also remember Tabby who was sane as a star and spent all his time lying on his back in the sink, thinking up appropriate names for me.
    Cats see their Keepers as massive phantoms, givers of names and the excellent gravy of their days.
    Cats who have been robbed of balls and claws do not lament. They become their Keeper's keepers.
    When cats are hosts to fleas they assume the fleas are guests.
    Most cats would rather be covered with live fleas than dead ones.
    Cats hold no grudges and have no future. They invade nets of strangers with their eyes.
    The patron saint of cats is called: Beast of the Skies, Warm Presence, Eyes.
    Cats do not worry about the gurgling horrors of the disease listed in catbooks, some of which are Hairballs Enteritis and Bronchitis. But they do become very upset about Symptoms, which is the worst disease of all.
    When cats grow listless (i.e. lose their list) they cease to entertain fleas. They mumble darkly about radishes and death. They listen to Beethoven and become overly involved in Medieval History.
    When cats decide to die they lie alone lost among leaves beneath the dark winds and broad thunders of the world and pray to the Beast of the Skies, Warm, Presence, Eyes.
    Broadly speaking, cats do not read Gothic novels, although they tend to browse through Mary Shelley on the day before Christmas.
    The only reason cats do not carry passports is because they have no pockets.
    When a black cat crosses your path it usually means that he is trying to get to the other side of the street.
    Cats never get baptized. They lose their dry.
    Cats only perspire during Lent.
    Cats have no memory and no future. They are highly allergic to Prime Ministers, radishes, monks, poets, and death.

    (view changes)
    2:52 pm

Sunday, June 13

  1. page Sentence Combining edited ... 6. Our manner was businesslike. 7. We stunned them with a blow on the back of the head. We …
    ...
    6. Our manner was businesslike.
    7. We stunned them with a blow on the back of the head.
    We caught two bass, and hauled them in in briskly, as if they were mackarel, pulling them over the side of the boat, not using a net, and with a businesslike manner, we stunned them with a blow on the back of the head.
    -- E.B. White
    B. l. The doctor's eye roved across the landscape.
    ...
    6. The gate led to the field.
    7. The gate led down toward the pond.
    The doctor's eye roved across the landscape, his eye quickly detecting a figure in black passing throug the gate which led to the field that led to the pond.
    --D.H. Lawrence
    C. l. Mrs. Lang saw herself as a counselor.
    ...
    6. She was armed with a repertory of sad looks.
    7. She was armed with a jar of fig preserves.
    Mrs. Lang saw herself as a wise and helpful counsellor who would appear on her neighbors doorstep at the first hint of trouble, armed with a treasure trove of cliches, a repertory of sad looks, and a jar of fig preservatives.
    D. l. Two men dozed.
    2. The two men were young.
    3. The two men were in the class.
    4. They succumbed to fatigue.
    ...
    to boredom. 6.
    6.
    They succumbed
    7. The classroom was crowded.
    8. They barely heard the voice of the instructor.
    9. The instructor detailed with enthusiasm.
    10. The instructor detailed the horrors of the Black Death.
    Two young men dozed in class, succumbing to fatigue, boredom, and the stiffness of the crowded classroom as they barely heard the voice of the instructor as he enthusiastically detailed the horrors of the Black Death.
    E. l. There is a spider.
    2. The spider is bulbous at the abdomen.
    ...
    15. Two of the corpses are moths.
    16. The moths' corpses are wingless.
    ...
    it, with the corpses that are the spider's
    -- Annie Dillard
    F. l. He ran upstairs.
    ...
    10. He wrapped her in the blanket.
    11. She was naked.
    He ran upstairs, took blankets from a bed, and put them before the fire until they were warm, then he removed her saturated, earthy smelling clothes, and rubbed her leg with a towel, and rapped her in the blanket, naked.
    -- D.H. Lawrence
    G l. Then he motioned.
    ...
    13. The movement was literary.
    14. The movement was "avant-garde."
    Corporal Max Klinger is a character on M.A.S.H., a popular television series, and is aptly named for a 18th century German playwright named Maximilian Klinger, who wrote play entitled Sturm und Drang, meaning Storm and Stress, which became an ''avant garde'' literary movement.
    (view changes)
    9:43 pm
  2. page Sentence Combining edited ... 15. Two of the corpses are moths. 16. The moths' corpses are wingless. There is a drab colo…
    ...
    15. Two of the corpses are moths.
    16. The moths' corpses are wingless.
    There is a drab colored spider with a bulbous abdomen in the bathroom, that has a torn web in the corner behind the toilet that is six inches in diameter with an earwig trapped in it, with the spider's kill - sow bugs, three spiders, and two wingless moths.
    -- Annie Dillard
    F. l. He ran upstairs.
    ...
    8. The driver drove around the mud castles.
    9. The mud castles had been built by ants.
    Then he motioned to the driver to go on, and the car moved along slowly, avoiding holes made by wart hogs, and mud castles built by ants.
    -- Ernest Hemingway
    H. l. Corporal Max Klinger is a character on "M.A.S.H."
    (view changes)
    9:06 pm
  3. page Sentence Combining edited ... Revise these paragraphs using compound and complex sentences. Paragraph 1: It was a dark and …
    ...
    Revise these paragraphs using compound and complex sentences.
    Paragraph 1: It was a dark and stormy night. The wind was high. The trees waved and crashed against the barn. I looked around me and saw that I wasn’t alone. A man stood behind me. He was tall. He was mean. He had a knife. It was shining in the moonlight. It was long and slender. He reached back. He stabbed with it. I jumped out of the way. I ran away.
    It was a dark and stormy night, complete with high winds that made the trees wave and crash against the barn. I looked around me and saw that I wasn't alone. A mean, tall man stood behind me with a knife. It was long and slender and shone in the moonlight. He reached back and stabbed with it. I jumped out of the way and ran.
    Paragraph 2: Tom prefers baseball to basketball. Baseball seems more interesting to Tom. Tom feels baseball is a gentleman’s sport. Baseball is more structured than basketball. Baseball requires athletes to use more skill than aggression when playing. Tom respects baseball players the most because of this.
    Tom prefers baseball to basketball, because baseball seems more interesting to him. He considers it a gentleman's sport, because it is more structured than basketball, and requires more skill than aggression when playing. Tom respects baseball players the most because of this.
    Exercise #2Exercise #2
    Combine each set of short sentences and fragments into one sentence.
    ...
    unless, because, even though, while, although, though
    12. Some students stay on the sidewalks. Some students cut across the grass.
    Some students stay on the sidewalks, while some cut across the grass.
    13. Students have to park far from their classrooms. They are often late for class.
    Students have to park far from their classrooms, even though they are often late for class.
    14. Trash cans have been placed all over campus. Students still throw garbage on the ground.
    Trash cans have been placed all over campus, although students still throw garbage on the ground.
    15. The administration promised to improve dining hall service. The quality of the food is actually worse this year.
    The administration promised to improve dining hall service, although the quality of the food is actually worse this year.
    16. These students do not respect the feelings of others. They do seem to respect themselves.
    These students do not respect the feelings of others, even though they do seem to respect themselves.
    17.We must stand up for our rights today. We may find ourselves with no rights at all.
    We must stand up for our rights today, because we may find ourselves with no rights at all.
    Exercise #3Exercise #3
    Make a single sentence from each of the groups of sentences below.
    (view changes)
    8:55 pm

Friday, June 11

  1. page Sentence Combining edited Exercise #1 Revise these paragraphs using compound and complex sentences. Paragraph 1: It was …

    Exercise #1
    Revise these paragraphs using compound and complex sentences.
    Paragraph 1: It was a dark and stormy night. The wind was high. The trees waved and crashed against the barn. I looked around me and saw that I wasn’t alone. A man stood behind me. He was tall. He was mean. He had a knife. It was shining in the moonlight. It was long and slender. He reached back. He stabbed with it. I jumped out of the way. I ran away.
    Paragraph 2: Tom prefers baseball to basketball. Baseball seems more interesting to Tom. Tom feels baseball is a gentleman’s sport. Baseball is more structured than basketball. Baseball requires athletes to use more skill than aggression when playing. Tom respects baseball players the most because of this.
    Exercise #2Exercise #2
    Combine each set of short sentences and fragments into one sentence.
    1. I always order cheese fries. The reason why is because they're my favorite.
    I always order cheese fries, because they are my favorite.
    2. Bob was my boyfriend. That was in high school. We dated for about eight months. Before I met Mike.
    Bob was my boyfriend in high school for eight months, before I met Mike.
    3. The tree fell on the house. This was a sycamore. Because of the high winds. But my grandmother wasn't hurt.
    The sycamore tree fell on the house because of the high winds, but my grandmother is not hurt.
    4. My dog's name is George. He is a Golden Retriever. He loves to play Frisbee. Loves to swim, too.
    My dog is a Golden Retriever named George who loves to play Frisbee and swim.
    5. My parents gave me a car. That is why I'm able to afford to go to college. Still, I work part-time. I work at Wal-Mart. I'm a cashier.
    My parents gave me a car so I can afford to go to college, but I still work part time at Wal-Mart as a cashier.
    Combine these six pairs of sentences using the coordinating conjunctions listed below. Use each conjunction only one time.
    and, but, or, so, yet, nor
    6. Some students stay on the sidewalks. Some students cut across the grass.
    Some students stay on the sidewalks, but some cut across the grass.
    7. Students have to park far from their classrooms. They are often late for class.
    Students have to park far from their classrooms, so they are often late for class.
    8. Trash cans have been placed all over campus. Students still throw garbage on the ground.
    Trash cans have been placed all over campus, but students still throw food on the ground.
    9. The administration promised to improve dining hall service. The quality of the food is actually worse this year.
    The administration promised improve dining hall service, yet the quality of the food is actually worse this year.
    10. These students do not respect the feelings of others. They don't seem to respect themselves.
    These students do not respect the feelings of others, nor do they respect themselves.
    11. We must stand up for our rights today. We may find ourselves with no rights at all.
    We must stand up for our rights today, or we may find ourselves with no rights at all.
    Combine the same sentences above using the subordinating conjunctions listed below. Again, use each conjunction only one time.
    unless, because, even though, while, although, though
    12. Some students stay on the sidewalks. Some students cut across the grass.
    13. Students have to park far from their classrooms. They are often late for class.
    14. Trash cans have been placed all over campus. Students still throw garbage on the ground.
    15. The administration promised to improve dining hall service. The quality of the food is actually worse this year.
    16. These students do not respect the feelings of others. They do seem to respect themselves.
    17.We must stand up for our rights today. We may find ourselves with no rights at all.
    Exercise #3Exercise #3
    Make a single sentence from each of the groups of sentences below.
    You must include all of the information which is given, but you may change the form of any word or the arrangement of the sentences. You should delete redundant words or phrases, and you may add prepositions and conjunctions.
    "Example":
    l. The students were diligent.
    2. The students followed their professor's instructions.
    3. The students wrote in their journals.
    4. The students wrote every day.
    "Single sentence": Diligently following their professor's instructions, the students wrote in their journals every day.
    "Exercises":
    A. l. We caught two bass.
    2. We hauled them in briskly.
    3. We hauled them in as though they were mackerel.
    4. We pulled them over the side of the boat.
    5. We did not use a landing net.
    6. Our manner was businesslike.
    7. We stunned them with a blow on the back of the head.
    -- E.B. White
    B. l. The doctor's eye roved across the landscape.
    2. His eye detected a figure.
    3. His eye was quick.
    4. The figure was in black.
    5. The figure passed through the gate.
    6. The gate led to the field.
    7. The gate led down toward the pond.
    --D.H. Lawrence
    C. l. Mrs. Lang saw herself as a counselor.
    2. Mrs. Lang saw herself as wise and helpful.
    3. She appeared on her neighbor's doorstep.
    4. She appeared at the first hint of trouble.
    5. She was armed with a treasure-trove of cliches.
    6. She was armed with a repertory of sad looks.
    7. She was armed with a jar of fig preserves.
    D. l. Two men dozed.
    2. The two men were young.
    3. The two men were in the class.
    4. They succumbed to fatigue.
    5. They succumbed to boredom. 6. They succumbed to the stuffiness of the classroom.
    7. The classroom was crowded.
    8. They barely heard the voice of the instructor.
    9. The instructor detailed with enthusiasm.
    10. The instructor detailed the horrors of the Black Death.
    E. l. There is a spider.
    2. The spider is bulbous at the abdomen.
    3. The spider is drab in color.
    4. The spider is in the bathroom.
    5. The spider has a web.
    6. The web is six inches in diameter.
    7. The web is in the corner.
    8. The corner is behind the toilet.
    9. The web is torn.
    10. An earwig is trapped in the web.
    11. Corpses are on the floor beneath the web.
    12. The corpses are the spider's kill.
    13. Most of the corpses are sow bugs.
    14. Three of the corpses are spiders.
    15. Two of the corpses are moths.
    16. The moths' corpses are wingless.
    -- Annie Dillard
    F. l. He ran upstairs.
    2. He took blankets from a bed.
    3. He put blankets before the fire.
    4. The blankets were warm.
    5. Then he removed her clothing.
    6. Her clothing was saturated.
    7. Her clothing was earthy-smelling.
    8. He rubbed her leg.
    9. He rubbed her with a towel.
    10. He wrapped her in the blanket.
    11. She was naked.
    -- D.H. Lawrence
    G l. Then he motioned.
    2. He motioned to the driver.
    3. The driver was to go on.
    4. The car moved slowly.
    5. The car moved along.
    6. The driver avoided holes.
    7. The holes had been made by wart hogs.
    8. The driver drove around the mud castles.
    9. The mud castles had been built by ants.
    -- Ernest Hemingway
    H. l. Corporal Max Klinger is a character on "M.A.S.H."
    2. "M.A.S.H." is a television series.
    3. "M.A.S.H." is popular.
    4. Corporal Klinger is aptly named.
    5. He is named for a playwright.
    6. The playwright is Maximilian Klinger.
    7. Maximilian Klinger was a German.
    8. Maximilian Klinger lived in the eighteenth century.
    9. Maximilian Klinger wrote a play.
    10. His play was entitled "Sturm und Drang."
    11. "Sturm und Drang" means "Storm and Stress."
    12. "Sturm und Drang" became the name of a movement.
    13. The movement was literary.
    14. The movement was "avant-garde."

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Thursday, June 10

  1. page Romeo and Juliet Questions edited ... 2. What does friar Lawrence say to comfort the Capulet family? He tells them that she died you…
    ...
    2. What does friar Lawrence say to comfort the Capulet family? He tells them that she died young and happy, instead of old and bitter.
    3. What event are the Capulets preparing for now? Juliet's funeral.
    ACT 5 SCENE 1
    1. What premonition does Romeo have at the beginning of this scene (lines 1-11)? He is thinking of Juliet breathing life into him.
    2. What news does Balthasar bring? How does this disrupt the Friar’s plan? He tells Romeo Juliet is dead. This interferes with the part of the plan where Romeo finds Juliet in her tomb and takes her away.
    3. Highlight line 24. Paraphrase. Why is this a brazen thing to say? ''Is it even so? Then I defy you stars.'' It is brazen because he is practically defying fate.
    4. What does Romeo decide to do after he hears Balthasar’s story (lines 34-57)? He decides to go lay in her tomb with her.
    ACT 5 SCENE 2ACT 5 SCENE 2
    1. What story does Friar John tell Friar Laurence as explanation as to why he could not deliver the letter to Romeo? He tells him that the plague interfered with the sending of the letter.
    ACT 5 SCENE 3ACT 5 SCENE 3
    1. Highlight lines 91-96. What does Romeo notice about Juliet? Explain the dramatic irony. He notices that she still looks beautiful and healthy. It is ironic because she is not dead, and he has no idea.
    2. Highlight line 167. What does Juliet realize about the situation? Juliet realizes Romeo is dead.
    3. Highlight lines 169-170. Explain the lines. She says that she will kiss him, and die off the poison residue on his skin.

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